camp

Normality

Normality is, by definition, relative. And with the arrival of my successor, I slowly start realizing that my year in Central African Republic is almost over. But I am also becoming fully aware that I won’t be able to share that year, my work, with most of my friends and family, with “normal” people. How could I explain to them that my normality, my daily routine, sometimes has nothing to do with theirs?

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A few people will understand, but the majority will either think that I am unconscious and naive, or a brave guy saving the world. Except that I’m neither of them. Our references, our perception of life, security or definition of common knowledge just became quite different over time. And there is nothing wrong with that.

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08 October 2013: Displaced cooking in Bossangoa, Central African Republic. [Click on the picture to enlarge it].

Sometimes, in extreme situations, you realize that normality is everything but universal. And that we all learn to cope with new situation, new surrounding. But are we all ready to leave our environment for something new? I have heard so many times people telling me that they would love to travel around the world, to work in Africa or to live far from their comfort zone. But what are they doing to realize that dream? What do you do to be yourself?

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Although I initially wanted to slightly improve the layout of my book before printing and publishing it, I finally decided to show my last big photo project in Darfur. This book was submitted as a final project for my MA in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography.

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Between September and November 2011, I spent a lot of time in Abu Shouk internally displaced persons’ (IDP) camp, in an attempt to show another reality in Darfur.

Despite the ongoing armed confrontations, many IDPs do not want to stay passive, just waiting to return home, relying on the largesse of the international community. Step by step, they have slowly and resolutely taken their lives into their own hands, learning new skills, using the resources at their disposal, building and hoping for a better future.

Fleeing from conflict and living in camps that were supposed to be temporary, they are trying to bring some semblance of stability into their lives, by existing between war and peace.

A book should be soon available on Blurb.

[EDIT:] My book is available on Blurb, in two different versions:

I didn’t mean to tell you… But…

Last sprint before the end of my Master’s. I should submit my critical report in one week and the finalize version of my book in two. Everything would be fine if I didn’t have to take a few last pictures and if I was not completely exhausted. Unfortunately, it is not going to improve, as I also will have to start my check-out. If only I could go to South East Asia right after, to empty my head and fill it with internal silence.

27 October 2011: Darfuri women learning about food processing in Abu Shouk Women Center. [Click on the picture to enlarge it].

Everything will be fine

Due to some recent incidents, my big project is not progressing as much as I would like to. And although I was supposed to be in Switzerland, celebrating the wedding of a close friend, I’m stuck in Sudan. By chance, after one month in El Fasher, working on different photo assignments, I’ve been sent to Khartoum for two days. At least, it gives me some time and space for pampering in a nice hotel. Next stop… Switzerland. In 6 weeks… Inch’allah.


09 October 2011: A classroom in Abu Shouk IDP camp. Schoolboys and girls seat on the floor, on a thin carpet and can be up to 100 per class. [Click on the picture to enlarge it].

Step by Step

After a long long week waiting, I finally got the authorization needed to continue my projet. There is a lot of work ahead, but it’s a good step. May the coming days be as productive …


03 October 2011: Mohamed Ishad, 27 years old. He left his village in Jebel Marra and his studies of the Holy Coran to come to Abu Shouk IDP camp. He now has his own shop, where he sells shoes. [Click on the picture to enlarge it].